Marisa Mori between Figurative and Futurist art

Marisa Mori, between Figurative and Futurist art

Curated by Monica Cardarelli

 

Having already dedicated exhibitions in Rome and Turin to this great female artist, and with a monographic study covering the entire corpus of her activity also currently in publication, Laocoon Gallery is proud to present in London.

Marisa Mori, a Florentine Futurist and descendant of Gian Lorenzo Bernini. She is a perfect example of the inexplicable oblivion into which supremely skilled female artists would often fall. A precocious talent, almost entirely self-taught until her arrival, in 1925, at the school of Felice Casorati in Turin.

Video

She quickly refined her innate artistic skills, and was invited to take part in exhibitions alongside her master from the outset, with art critics of the time immediately taking note, commenting on the quality of stroke, the composition and the colour, evident in works such as Via Lanfranchi, The still life Grapefruit and eggs, Marina di Massa, Study for two masks and her many self-portraits in both pastel and charcoal.

Mori’s independent spirit alongside a desire to experiment and learn led her around 1930 to approach the futurist movement. An old black and white photo portrays her proudly dressed as an aviator – in overalls, cap and glasses – sitting in the cockpit of a two-seater aerobatic plane – a flight which would inspire Mori to the creation of her bright and almost “sensual” futurist works: best represented by Mechanical Deconstruction of a crowd – she continued in this vein until the enactment of the Racial Laws, at which point she decided to distance herself from the futurist movement in protest, beginning a fourth phase of her artistic production – during which she portrayed subjects such as Florence immediately after its bombing, English soldiers whom she hosted in her large Florentine house, as well as returning to some of the subjects which had always been dear to her, creating some remarkable depictions of masks, still lifes and female portraits

Artworks

Mechanical deconstruction of the crowd

Marisa Mori, c.1933

Oil on cardboard, 81 x 110 cm
P.O.A

Via Lanfranchi

Marisa Mori, 1926

Oil on panel, 46 x 50 cm
P.O.A

verso Via Lanfranchi

Marisa Mori, 1926

Oil on panel, 46 x 50 cm
P.O.A

Reading woman

Marisa Mori, 1929-30

Oil on cardboard, 35 x 33 cm
P.O.A

Grapefruit and eggs

Marisa Mori, c.1935-40

Oil on panel, 45 x 49 cm
P.O.A

Study for two masks

Marisa Mori, 1931

Oil on panel, 58 x 44 cm
P.O.A

Marina di Massa

Marisa Mori, 1930

Oil on panel, 52 x 52 cm
P.O.A

Self portrait

Marisa Mori, 1930

Oil on panel, 44 x 51 cm
P.O.A

Luciferian self portrait

Marisa Mori, c.1926

Charcoal on pape, 50 x 33 cm
P.O.A

Luciferian self portrait

Marisa Mori, c.1926

Charcoal on pape, 50 x 36,5 cm
P.O.A

Self-portrait in a circle

Marisa Mori, 1929-30

Charcoal and pastel on paper, 48,3×34,4 cm
P.O.A

Self portrait

Marisa Mori, 1925

Charcoal on paper, 43×30,3 cm
P.O.A

Self portrait

Marisa Mori, c.1928

Charcoal on pape, 48 x 33 cm
P.O.A

Female portrait with a necklace

Marisa Mori, c.1928

48,5 x 34 cm
P.O.A

Fishermen’s nets

Marisa Mori, 1950-55

Oil on panel, 60 x 50 cm
P.O.A

Masks and guitar

Marisa Mori, 1928-29

Oil on panel, 51 x 54 cm
P.O.A

English soldier

Marisa Mori, c.1944-45

Thick pencil on paper, 35,5 x 24 cm
P.O.A

Preparatory drawing for Soldier with a helmet

Marisa Mori, c.1944-45

Pencil on paper, 33 x 24 cm
P.O.A

 Soldier with helmet

Marisa Mori, 1945

Charcoal on paper, 32.5 x 25 cm

P.O.A

Ruins of Florence

Marisa Mori, 1945

Oil on panel, 49 x 35 cm
P.O.A

The Commedia dell’Arte. Masks and Carnival in Italian 20th Century Art

The Commedia dell’Arte

Masks and Carnival in Italian 20th Century Art

When she is not wearing a facemask covering her mouth to indicate that she is mute, the personification of painting, as portrayed by ancient painters, is a woman displaying in most cases a full face mask hanging from her neck. It is a symbol of the imitation of nature: art imitates reality, like an actor disguised to play a part. We want to remind this connection between the mask and painting for this exhibition by Laocoon Gallery celebrating, with the title of “The Commedia dell’Arte”, Italian masks in XXth Century art.

Watch the video

At the centre of this thematic collection is an impressive series of drawings by the visionary Italian artist Alberto Martini (1876-1954), a precursor of surrealism. His series “Il Libro delle Ombre” (The Book of Shadows), begun in 1904, consists of 29 drawings in brush and black china ink portraying masked faces in all possible kinds of disguise. Full false faces, vizards, half masks, eye masks, and black domino cloaks with venetian 18th century three cornered hats, all drawn with speedy brushstrokes as in Chinese painting, nocturnal and mysterious in character, illustrations of some dramatic and gothic poem whose words are lost. These enigmatic and obsessive faces, look like Rorschach’s patches appearing in a nightmare, populating some Venetian perpetual night, in which we wouldn’t be surprised to meet the heavily made up disquieting eyes of Marchesa Casati, famous for her eccentric venetian masked balls, for which Martini acted as costume designer and court portrait-painter.

With the figurative remembrance of Tiepolo in mind, we find ourselves in Venice, the ideal capital of masks, with her ancient old carnival where actors on the stage wore masks as well as the people in the audience.

A large painting by Ugo Rossi (1906-1990), almost four metres wide, portrays Venice’s piazza San Marco crowded with people in all kinds of colourful carnival costumes. It used to hang in the bar in one of the luxurious transatlantic ships that were the monuments of post war enthusiastic optimism, a way to represent Italy as a country of perpetual enjoyment after the horror and destruction of the past conflict.

Venetian scenes with carnival masks were a favourite theme of the artist Umberto Brunelleschi (1879-1949), a Tuscan who had a successful career in Paris as costume designer, scenographer and fashion illustrator. By him are two of his typical pochoirs with amorous couples courting, the study for a poster dedicated to a Venetian feast held in the Cercle de l’Union Interalliées in Paris. In another watercolour he paints his own portrait, it is the study for a poster advertising the theatre play “The Mask and the Face”, a now forgotten work by Luigi Chiarelli that had at the time wide international success in the footsteps of Pirandello’s influential example.

Directly inspired by Pirandello was the painter Giovanni Marchig, who’s masterpiece, “Death of an author”(1924), showing a playwright dead at his desk surrounded by all the characters of the “commedia dell’arte” in despair is now in Palazzo Pitti. He was an enchanting painter, little known because he put aside his painter’s brush in the last part of his life to become a famed old master’s restorer, very close to Bernard Berenson. His current fame comes from having been the former owner of Leonardo’s controversial drawing “La Bella Principessa”. Laocoon Gallery is proud to present a newly rediscovered portrait by Marchig (1933), of a young actor dressed up as Harlequin. He has his multi-coloured costume but he doesn’t wear a mask, he’s off stage, resting, his arms folded. The emphasis this time is on the face, on the real person of the actor when not possessed by his character.

Cezanne introduced Italian masks into modern painting, and Picasso in his blue period, followed his lead, but the modern painter who most of all chose and cherished Harlequins and Pulcinellas as subjects and mirrors of his own soul is certainly Gino Severini (1883-1966). The frescoes with dancing and playing masquerades that he painted for Sir George Sitwell in his castle at Montegufoni in Tuscany is a joyous little Sistine Chapel of twentieth-century art. A large cartoon by Severini for a “Concert” oil painting of 1942 will be exhibited along with two charming “pochoirs” and a wax pastel drawing of Harlequin and Pulcinella, preparatory for a famous lithograph of the early 50’s.

After the First World War the man who most promoted as the pinnacle of fashion 18th century’s Venitian style’s Bals Masqués was certainly the French painter Jean Gabriel Domergue (1889-1962). His Parisian Bal Venitien at the Opera in 1922 was only the first of a series held subsequently in Monte Carlo, Cannes, Biarritz and Deauville. He would design the costumes, the programmes, the posters and portray the most prominent and aristocratic beauties as provoking Venetian Ladies coming out from some of Casanova’s alcoves. He also decorated residences and public nightspots with gilded canvases wonderfully sketched over with dreamy elegant scenes of Venetian carnival. The like of these, now mostly dispersed if not destroyed, can be seen assembled in Domergue’s own villa in Cannes, now a Museum where the Jury of the Cinema Festival sits when the Palme d’Or awards are decided. Three rare panels gilded with golden leaves by Domergue with gondolas, amorous masks and beautiful venetian ladies are the most visibly precious lots in this exhibition. He is here at the height of his elegant art.

It is the world of Casanova, reinterpreted with the spirit of the “anneés folles”. The famous Venetian womanizer is portrayed in full mask with a masked puppet in each hand. It is the study for the cover of a play, “The Marriage of Casanova” (1910), in which the title role hero acts as puppeteer of all the characters in the plot. It is the work of Oscar Ghiglia (1876-1945), who was Ugo Ojetti’s – Italy’s master art critic of the time and the author of the play – favourite painter.
Metaphysical masks as the centrepieces of enigmatic still lifes are in the paintings of Casorati’s pupil Marisa Mori as well as in a very early and interesting work by Aligi Sassu (1929). Among other drawings we quote also a moving illustration of Harlequin taken to Heaven by angels, a work of the illustrator Enrico Sacchetti that belonged to the famous comic performer Ettore Petrolini. Attributed to Sacchetti is also the original drawing for the cover of one Pirandello’s collection of short stories “Terzetti” of 1912, where a Muse amuses herself wearing one different mask after another. Another Harlequin is painted by contemporary artist Pino Pascali, from the time when he was creating animated films for television advertisement: Arlecchino used to be a very renowned brand of tinned tomatoes.

Ancient and Modern Classicism in Italy – Online Exhibition

Ancient and Modern Classicism in Italy

Online Exhibition

 

For the Summer of 2020 Galleria del Laocoonte and W. Apolloni of Rome have prepared a monumental exhibition centred around the inspiration that Italian Twentieth Century art drew from the ancient Graeco-Roman figurative civilisation. Among the many works presented, the wide painted panel by master of fresco Achille Funi (1890-1972), representing Parnassus, towers over every other. Pompeian in inspiration, it used to decorate the classroom in Brera where the painter himself taught fresco technique until his death.

Another exceptional piece, for both size and force of expression, is the coloured cartoon by Alberto Ziveri (1908-1990) depicting the goddess Minerva with the attributes of Rome, employed to make the colossal mosaic for the firefighter’s school near Rome. A small, exquisite bronze by Duilio Cambellotti (1876-1960) entitled Armour, celebrates the ancient roman rural labourer that would take arms if his Country were in peril, combining the dynamic simplicity of modernity with the memory of archaic pre-classical bronzes. In a similar way the sculptor Libero Andreotti (1875-1933) cast his Venere-Fortuna as if it were an early renaissance bronze. In addition to this, La Vigne, a rare sculpture by Andreotti in Candoglia’s marble – the stone used at Milan’s Duomo – portrays a seductive Bacchante, with a drunken little Bacchus lying on her back, the teeth marks of the chisel recalling Michelangelo’s non-finito working practise.

Beauty and struggle are what we prize in art, as shown by our adoption of Laocoön as the symbol for our galleries in both Rome and London. The life-size Laocoön marble group by Vincenzo de’ Rossi, a two tonne mannerist masterpiece that stands at the centre of our roman exhibiting space is both a symbol and an aesthetic paragon for us, and can be viewed alongside Patrick Alò’s contemporary interpretation of the same subject thanks to London Art Week’s new online platform.

Artworks

ACHILLE FUNI

The Parnassus, 1948-53

Tempera and gold leaf on panel, 212×476 cm
£100,000.00

Alberto Ziveri

Minerva, c.1940,

Pencil, charcoal and pastel on paper, 377×200 cm
P.O.A.

Andrea Spadini

Leda and the swan, 1958

Glazed ceramic, 80x52x27 cm
£ 42,000.00

Andrea Spadini

Dancing monkeys, 1956

Glazed ceramic, 28x9x12 cm
(Set of 4) £ 24,000.00

Andrea Spadini

Dancing monkeys, 1956

Glazed ceramic, 28x9x12 cm
(Set of 4) £ 24,000.00

Andrea Spadini

Dancing monkeys, 1956

Glazed ceramic, 28x9x12 cm
(Set of 4) £ 24,000.00

Andrea Spadini

Dancing monkeys, 1956

Glazed ceramic, 28x9x12 cm
(Set of 4) £ 24,000.00

Andrea Spadini

Sailing monkeys, 1954-55,

Glazed ceramic, 21.5×31.5 cm
(Set of 4) £ 28,000.00

Andrea Spadini

Sailing monkeys, 1954-55,

Glazed ceramic, 21.5×31.5 cm
(Set of 4) £ 28,000.00

Andrea Spadini

Sailing monkeys, 1954-55,

Glazed ceramic, 21.5×31.5 cm
(Set of 4) £ 28,000.00

Andrea Spadini

Sailing monkeys, 1954-55,

Glazed ceramic, 21.5×31.5 cm
(Set of 4) £ 28,000.00

Andrea Spadini

The river Tiber, 1959-60

Silver, 26x40x11 cm
£ 62,000.00

Antonio Canova

Joachim Murat & Caroline Bonaparte, 1813

Plaster, 66 & 58.5 cm respectively
P.O.A.

Corrado Cagli

Laocoon, 1938,

Monotype, 325×250 mm
£ 15,000.00

Corrado Cagli

St. John’s Eve, 1934

Encaustic on panel, 40×59.7 cm
£ 75,000.00

Duilio Cambellotti

Armour, 1918-19

Bronze, h 43 cm, base 20 cm
£ 60,000.00

Duilio Cambellotti

The Eumenides, 1948

Tempera on paper, 70.3×74 cm
£ 25,000.00

Duilio Cambellotti

The Prefect of Rome’s Punishement, 1948-50

Tempera on paper, 360×996 mm
£ 18,000.00

Gino Severini

Flora, 1939

Tempera and Indian ink on paper, 60×48 cm
£ 20,000.00

Gino Severini

Silvano

Indian ink on paper, 60×48 cm
£ 20,000.00

Libero Andreotti

The Vine, 1909

Marble, 68.5x36x30 cm
£ 180,000.00

Libero Andreotti

Venus Fortune, 1928-31

Bronze, 78x25x15 cm
£ 120,000.00

Maria Savinio

Centaurina, 1950

Embroideery on canvas, 41.5×31 cm
£ 12,000.00

Maria Savinio

Orpheus the widower, 1952-54

Embroidery on canvas, 48×39 cm
£ 12,000.00

Maria Savinio

The return of the goddess to the temple, 1944

Embroidery on canvas, 52×38 cm
£ 12,000.00

Mario Sironi

Fighting soldiers, 1935

Pencil and watercolour Indian ink, 56×54 cm
£ 21,000.00

Patrick Alò

Chimera, 2009

Scrap iron, 140x100x90 cm
£ 40,000.00

Patrick Alò

 Laocoon, 2013

Scrap iron,180x100x100 cm
£ 60,000.00

Patrick Alò

Wolf, 2015

Scrap iron, 110x90x40 cm
£ 35,000.00

Publio Morbiducci

Horses, c.1941

Plaster, 44.5x49x14.5cm
£ 18,000.00 (each)

Publio Morbiducci

Horses, c.1941

Plaster, 44.5x49x14.5cm
£ 18,000.00 (each)

Vincenzo de’ Rossi

Laocoon and his two sons, c.1580

Marble, 197x147x68 cm

P.O.A

Vittorio Grassi

Remembrance festival of the proclamation of Italy, 1910

200×69 cm

P.O.A.

XX The Female Gender in Twentieth Century Art – Online Exhibition

XX THE FEMALE GENDER IN XXth CENTURY ART

Online Exhibition

 

XX: THE FEMALE GENDER IN XXth CENTURY ITALIAN ART is the latest in a series of meaningful exhibitions by curator Monica Cardarelli, and is the first exhibition to be made available online by Laocoon Gallery following its successful inauguration in Florence and subsequent displays in Rome, Milan and London.

The complete exhibition comprised around one hundred works, with techniques ranging between paintings, drawings, pastels, bronzes, terracotta and ceramics, of Italian artists from the 20th Century who represented as many female figures. Wives or lovers, virgins or prostitutes, holy mothers like the Madonna or man-eating she-devils. Chaste teenagers or mature Magdalenes, but also goddesses, nymphs, legendary personifications of Spring or Italy, imposing and shapely figures wearing crowns of turreted walls.

The title of the exhibition uses “XX” as both chromosomes and Roman numerals in order to represent not only the genes that determine a woman’s sex but also the 20th Century, an era which saw unprecedented change in the role, status, appearance and condition of women.

Exhibition curator, gallery director and strong advocate of women’s rights Monica Cardarelli, who has researched and brought together this astonishing selection of art portraying the female gender in its many representations and transfigurations, says of the exhibition, “In a single image we can find a myriad of stories and destinies that intertwine and overlap, and this is also the case for each of the other images that make up this exhibition. Each contains stories that oscillate between past and present, leading to a series of reflections, to which are added those generated by their being together, by the dialogue that inevitably they entertain while standing side by side.”

Artworks

ACHILLE FUNI

Lucrezia Romana, c.1940

Oil on canvas, 60 x50 cm
£30,000.00

ACHILLE FUNI

Ugo and Parisina, 1934

Pastel on mounted paper, 93 x 72 cm
P.O.A

ALBERTO MARTINI

Aurelia, the actress Jenny Colon, 1934

Watercolour on paper, 30 x 21.1 cm
£15,000.00

ALBERTO SAVINIO

Portrait of Marcella Giulini, 1949

Oil on panel, 30.3 x 40.5 cm
P.O.A

ALBERTO ZIVERI

Postribolo, 1945

Oil on canvas, 23 x 26 cm
£18,000.00

ALBERTO ZIVERI

Female nude with a fan, 1958

Oil on canvas, 170 x 90 cm
P.O.A

ANDREA SPADINI

Amaca Zanardo, 1954

Terracotta, 35 x 12 x 33 cm
£10,000.00

ANDREA SPADINI

Girl with a bird, 1939

Tuff, 46 x 48 x 27 cm
£16,000.00

ANDREA SPADINI

Leda and the swan, 1959

Glazed ceramic, 80 x 52 x 27 cm
P.O.A

ANTONIO CANOVA

Joachim Murat & Caroline Bonaparte, 1813

Plaster, 66 x 26 x27 – 58.5 x 26 x 27 cm
P.O.A

ANTONIO MANCINI

Female figure, c.1915

Charcoal and pastel on paper, 41 x 27 cm
£8,500.00

ANTONIO SCORDIA

Portrait of Valentina, 1951

Oil on canvas, 150 x 100 cm
£28,000.00

ARMANDO SPADINI

Study for the finding of Moses

Oil on canvas, 70 x 57.5 cm
£26,000.00

DINO BUZZATI

The Harem, 1958

Pastel on paper, 29.2 x 39.5 cm
£20,000.00

EDITA WALTEROWNA BROGLIO

Study for Terrace by the sea, 1949

Pencil on paper, 96 x 123 cm
£25,000.00

ENRICO PRAMPOLINI

Female nude, c.1945

Indian ink on paper, 27 x 21 cm
£6,000.00

ENRICO PRAMPOLINI

Female nude, c.1945

Indian ink on paper, 27 x 21 cm
£6,000.00

ENRICO SACCHETTI

Fashion and women, 1913

Tempera pouchoir, 32.5 x 24 cm
£5,000.00

ENRICO SACCHETTI

Fashion and women

Tempera pouchoir, 32.4 x 24 cm
£5,000.00

ENRICO SACCHETTI

Portrait of Eleonora Duse, c.1910

Tempera pouchoir, 35 x 26 cm
£7,000.00

FERRUCCIO FERRAZZI

Figure of the Merry go round, 1936

Oil on canvas, 50 x 42 cm
£16,000.00

FERRUCCIO FERRAZZI

Naked girl, 1936

Oil on canvas, 74 x 52 cm
£40,000.00

GIULIO ARISTIDE SARTORIO

Reading woman, 1891

Pastel on paper, 85 x 48 cm
£40,000.00

LEA MONETTI

Laocoon Mother, 2015

Bronze, 79 x 66 x 27.5 cm
£40,000.00

LIBERO ANDREOTTI

Venus Fortune, 1928-31

Bronze, 78 x 25 x 15 cm
P.O.A

LILA DE NOBILI

Sketch for the costume of Maria Callas in La Traviata, 1955

Indian ink and watercolour on grey paper, 24.5 x 18 cm
£10,000.00

MARGHERITA VANARELLI

Female figure with a child in a high chair, 1963

Mix media on paper, 27.5 x 21.5 cm
£7,000.00

PIETRO GAUDENZI

Bread bearers (from Il Grano triptych), 1940

Pastel on mounted paper, 230 x 140 cm
P.O.A

PIETRO GAUDENZI

Farmers of Anticoli Corrado (from Il Grano triptych), 1940

Pastel on mounted paper, 230 x 140 cm
P.O.A

RENATO GUTTUSO

Medusa, 1985

Indian ink and watercolour on paper, 40.5 x 41.5 cm
£16,000.00

ROBERTO MELLI

Portrait of Anna Maria Passarella, 1954

Oil on canvas, 150 x 90 cm
£35,000.00

THAYAHT

Manekinos, 1922

Pencil and tempera on paper, 20 x 13 cm
£8,000.00

UBALDO OPPI

Portrait of his wife Adele Leone, 1923-24

Pencil on paper, 70 x 58 cm
£25,000.00

UMBERTO BRUNELLESCHI

America goddess of war, c.1935

Tempera and pencil on paper, 33 x 25 cm
£7,000.00

UMBERTO BRUNELLESCHI

United States Army Red Cross nurse, c.1935

Tempera and pencil on paper, 35 x 25 cm
£7,000.00

Alberto Martini

Alberto Martini

Following great success at Galleria del Laocoonte and W. Apolloni in Rome, Laocoon Gallery now presents to London a fascinating collection of art by Alberto Martini (Oderzo 1876 – Milan 1954).

Exhibition dates: 1st – 28th November 2019

 

The show comprises a mixture of works including gloriously sinister illustrations in Indian ink for the tales of Edgar Allan Poe alongside a selection of works from Il Poema Delle Ombre (Poem of the Shadows), a mysterious collection which the artist produced in 1904 and continued in 1909.

 

The stimulus for these works is unknown, perhaps they were designed to illustrate a poem or theatrical text, the only clue to the puzzle is a condensed list comprising an enigmatic summary which in fact makes the function of the illustrations even more mysterious. A mute chorus of masks is watching us.

 

There is Venice and its carnival, but there are also masks of conspirators, perhaps of thieves and murderers, as well as voluptuous veiled female masks that make us think of conspiracies of another kind; of secret conferences and kisses between unknown lovers, of the streets of Venice by night, filled with intriguing characters, from the great Casanova to the devastating femme fatale Marchesa Casati.

XX: The Female Gender in XXth Century Italian Art

XX: THE FEMALE GENDER IN XXth CENTURY ITALIAN ART

 

is the latest in a series of meaningful exhibitions by curator Monica Cardarelli to be brought to Laocoon Gallery of London following its successful inauguration in Italy.

 

Preview: 29th November 2019

The exhibition comprises around one hundred works, with techniques ranging between paintings, drawings, pastels, bronzes, terracotta and ceramics, of Italian artists from the 20th Century who represented as many female figures. Wives or lovers, virgins or prostitutes, holy mothers like the Madonna or man-eating she-devils.

 

Chaste teenagers or mature Magdalenes, but also goddesses, nymphs, legendary personifications of Spring or Italy, imposing and shapely figures wearing crowns of turreted walls. The title of the exhibition uses “XX” as both chromosomes and Roman numerals in order to represent not only the genes that determine a woman’s sex but also the 20th Century, an era which saw unprecedented change in the role, status, appearance and condition of women.

 

Exhibition curator, gallery director and strong advocate of women’s rights Monica Cardarelli, who has researched and brought together this astonishing selection of art portraying the female gender in its many representations and transfigurations, says of the exhibition, “In a single image we can find a myriad of stories and destinies that intertwine and overlap, and this is also the case for each of the other images that make up this exhibition. Each contains stories that oscillate between past and present, leading to a series of reflections, to which are added those generated by their being together, by the dialogue that inevitably they entertain while standing side by side.”

 

The exhibition runs from 1st December to 30th January, inviting visitors to explore and share their responses to the vast array of inspiration adorning the gallery walls.

 

For enquiries and further information
E: info@laocoongallery.co.uk
T: 020 8075 3903
www.laocoongallery.co.uk

David Breuer-Weil

Laocoon Gallery opens in London 

Exciting new gallery opens in the heart of the historic art district of London.

 

As the art scene in London continues to be a pole of attraction for a variety of cultural offerings, Galleria del Laocoonte has gone into partnership with W. Apolloni, one of the most experienced and highly distinguished art dealers in Rome, to open the Laocoon Gallery. Set in the heart of the historic art and antiques district of St James’ the gallery will not only present an exceptional selection of works from the most seminal figures in Western art history, but also brings to London previously unseen pieces from a number of early 20th century Italian artists. Monica Cardarelli, director of Laocoon Gallery in London, says, “Italian 20th century art is not only Futurism, or De Chirico, or the few other artists who are well known outside Italy. There is a real crowd of exceptional artists that need to be revealed to the world of English-speaking art lovers.”

 

Following a successful exhibition of works by renowned Italian sculptor Leoncillo Leonardi which opened as part of London Art Week, the gallery’s next offering will be based on the myth of Laocoön, featuring a large bronze by English born David Breuer-Weil, who has emerged as one of the leading contemporary British sculptors with iconic works such as Brothers, Flight and Alien, displayed to great public and critical acclaim in major public spaces in London and around the world. The artist has been commissioned by renowned art dealer Marco Fabio Apolloni to create and cast for the Laocoon Gallery a striking new work inspired by the ancient statue of Laocoön that was excavated in Rome in 1506 under Michelangelo’s very eyes. The piece shows a cyclopean head of Laocoön composed with shattered rubble, which emerges from the soil as if it were coming up from the deep to take a breath. In a number of smaller scale explorations and preparations also set to be exhibited, the iconic original in its entirety is handled using wax, engulfing Laocoön and his sons with snake coils that become tentacles or strands of DNA.

 

Breuer-Weil comments, “Laocoön is a great sculpture that has inspired generations of artists because of its sheer expressive force and as an emblem of martyrdom. I have not tried to copy it but to explore its themes in a relevant contemporary manner making the works speak to today’s generation.  In some of my works, the Laocoön and his sons are not attacked by snakes as in the Greek myth that inspired the original ancient sculpture but by their own DNA, because that is usually the biggest threat we have to face in our lives, our own makeup.”

 

The exhibition opens on 12th September 2019 at the Laocoon Gallery, 2a-4 Ryder Street, London, SW1Y 6QB.

Leoncillo, Drawings and Sculptures

Leoncillo. drawings and Sculptures

27 June – 7 September 2019

GALLERIA DEL LAOCOONTE & W. APOLLONI AT THE LAOCOON GALLERY
2a-4 Ryder Street.
www.laocoongallery.co.uk
info@laocoongallery.co.uk

CONTACT
Eleonora Falovo, +447908 380390

Following a successful exhibition at London Art Week in the summer of 2018, Galleria del Laocoonte has again gone into partnership with W. Apolloni, one of Rome’s oldest and most illustrious antique dealer shops, to exhibit at London Art Week 2019.

Founded in 1926, Galleria W. Apolloni has been in business for three generations and is now directed by Marco Fabio Apolloni, a writer, journalist and art historian trained at the Courtauld Institute in London. During its successful history the gallery has sold many masterpieces to museums in Italy and abroad, examples include the Coaci inkstand to the Minneapolis Institute of Art and the Petiet’s family portraits by Andrea Appiani to the Villa Reale in Milan.

In 2012, together with his wife Monica Cardarelli he founded Galleria del Laocoonte, which has specialised in presenting the works of 20th century Italian artists including Sironi, Savinio, Severini, Balla and many others with exhibitions at their gallery in Rome, fairs across Europe and even in public museums. Seven years later they are embarking on a new exciting project here in London, opening Laocoon Gallery which presents not only the best examples of Italian old master paintings and drawings, sculptures, works of art and high quality pieces of furniture, but also works by early 20th century Italian artists, many of them totally unknown by the international market.

One highlight of this year’s London Art Week exhibition at the Laocoon Gallery is a collection of works by Leoncillo Leonardi – known for his work with ceramics and glazed terracotta. Leoncillo (1915 – 1968) has become more recognised in recent years, with his large abstract works from the later part of his career gaining interest on a global scale. The exhibitors are just as passionate about his early works though, Monica Cardarelli, director of Laocoon Gallery says, “… the rest of his [Leoncillo’s] works, beginning in the thirties’ with astounding figurative ceramic sculptures, have never been shown as they should. It is our belief that the unveiling of these pieces will be a revelation that will set him in his proper place as one of Europe’s major sculptors.”